Contact Us
TEL: +86-020-36754186
Fax: +86-020-62824861
E-mail: insco@inscohk.com
Address: P.O.Box 901, 9F, Herun Plaza, No.2 Danan Rd, Yuexiu District, Guangzhou, China
Home > Knowledge > Content
The composition and origin of perfume
Jan 16, 2018

Perfume is a mixture of fragrant essential oils or aroma compounds, fixatives and solvents, used to give the human body, animals, food, objects, and living-spaces an agreeable scent.[1] It is usually in liquid form and used to give a pleasant scent to a person's body. Ancient texts and archaeological excavations show the use of perfumes in some of the earliest human civilizations. Modern perfumery began in the late 19th century with the commercial synthesis of aroma compounds such as vanillin or coumarin, which allowed for the composition of perfumes with smells previously unattainable solely from natural aromatics alone.The word perfume derives from the Latin perfumare, meaning "to smoke through". Perfumery, as the art of making perfumes, began in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt, and was further refined by the Romans and Persians.The world's first-recorded chemist is considered a woman named Tapputi, a perfume maker mentioned in a cuneiform tablet from the 2nd millennium BC in Mesopotamia.[2] She distilled flowers, oil, and calamus with other aromatics, then filtered and put them back in the still several times.also have crystal oil bottle and perfume bottle.

17-P003-C.jpg [3]In India, perfume and perfumery existed in theIndus civilization (3300 BC – 1300 BC). One of the earliest distillations of Ittar was mentioned in the Hindu Ayurvedic text Charaka Samhita and Sushruta Samhita.[4]In 2003,[5] archaeologists uncovered what are believed[by whom?] to be the world's oldest surviving perfumes in Pyrgos, Cyprus. The perfumes date back more than 4,000 years. They were discovered in an ancient perfumery, a 300-square-meter (3,230 sq ft) factory

[5] housing at least 60 stills, mixing bowls, funnels, and perfume bottles. In ancient times people used herbs and spices, such as almond, coriander, myrtle, conifer resin, and bergamot, as well as flowers.

17-G010-P.jpg

[6]Etruscan perfume vase shaped like a female head, 2nd century BCIn the 9th century the Arab chemist Al-Kindi (Alkindus) wrote the Book of the Chemistry of Perfume and Distillations, which contained more than a hundred recipes for fragrant oils, salves, aromatic waters, and substitutes or imitations of costly drugs. The book also described 107 methods and recipes for perfume-making and perfume-making equipment, such as the alembic (which still bears its Arabic name.[7][8] [from Greek ἄμβιξ, "cup", "beaker"][9][10] described by Synesius in the 4th century[11]).

Email : insco@inscohk.com



Previous: Perfume bottles --- small bottles, the world

Next: Perfume or eau de toilette? What's the difference?